Kenny Wong - Portfolio

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Kenny Wong P o r t f o l i o

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Page 1: Kenny Wong - Portfolio

Kenny WongP o r t f o l i o

Page 2: Kenny Wong - Portfolio
Page 3: Kenny Wong - Portfolio

House for a FilmmakerKroeber Plaza Gallery

Hustle & SlowStitch Space

Wellfleet Add-OnFreeplay

KTGY GroupSmall Works

3657 Jasmine Avenue Apt. #3Los Angeles, CA 90034

(626) [email protected]/knnywng

B.A. in Architecture, 2011University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture, 2019 expectedMaster of Urban & Regional Planning, 2019 expectedUniversity of California, Los Angeles

CON

TEN

TS

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Diagrams:Solid Division

Void Recombination

HOUSE FOR AFILMMAKEROAKLAND, CALIFORNIAThis project was the result of a unique studio where each student revisited a previously completed work. After lying dormant for a year, the House for a Filmmaker was revived from a larger project to develop a film school. Taking the component for housing an instructor of the school, the original concept was distilled and refreshed through exploratory diagrams and the assistance of parametric software. The new analysis clarified the original concepts of light, transparency, and layering to carry the project to a new solution.

The film school had introduced life to a desolate site in West Oakland with its program for a large outdoor theater. Its mass is concentrated on one end of the site while the House for a Filmmaker sits opposite of it, allowing the house to function as a projection booth for the open air theater. In its context surrounded by passing cars, a freeway exit, and the nearby BART line, the original project created a connection to the surrounding motion with cuts through the house. Clear sections created the effect of a zoetrope as speeding vehicles encircled it.

The reworked project became more nuanced in realization while maintaining its essential concepts. Rather than create literal slices through the building, views into and through the house are mediated by a new perforated skin. The skin allows another narrative of spaces to be developed inside, replacing the disruptive cuts of before. Determined by a parametric definition, the changing sizes of the metal scrim’s apertures subtly imply the sequence of spaces within. The enclosure also modifies the house’s attitude on the site, now emphasizing the foreign nature of a residence in such a context. The relationship to motion around the house remains and is registered in the torque of the skin panels.

ARCH

101 / FALL 2011 / A

CAD

EMIC W

ORK

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Analysis of Original Project

Building Skin Studies1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2.1 2.2

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FORM

PRI

MIT

IVE

1X 1X+ 2X HYBRID 2X 3X

TRIM

UN

ION

SHIF

T / D

IFFE

REN

CE

2.2

Building Form Studies

2.3 2.4 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

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Concept Diagrams:Mass & Veil Site Model

Projection into Context

Spatial Overlay

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Plans: 1

ASections:

A

B

C

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2

B

3

C

2 40 8 16 32'

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KROEBER PLAZAGALLERYBERKELEY, CALIFORNIAThe objective of the project is to create a monumental entrance to the university, one that reflects the unique culture and ideas of this area on campus. A landmark demonstrating the transition into the academic environment along the likes of Sather Gate, or North Gate is missing from this major corridor. The proposed gallery interacts with the existing massing of its adjacent buildings to frame this southern entrance and draw movement through its cover. The gallery introduces vertical compression to the open corner between Wurster and Kroeber Halls. Once under and through the gallery, the view opens back onto of the university’s signature Sather Tower.

Approaching the campus from College Avenue, those in the neighborhood would be intrigued by this floating gallery that peeks from behind the trees. Beyond creating a visual and physical entrance to the university, the project also houses the products of students in the art and architecture departments for viewing. It engages minds, presenting the intellectual output of the university to include the public as part of its discourse in each of its components. The blank wall allows for direct participation and the courtyard provides a space for performance art.

By reclaiming the glade in front the buildings as well, the courtyard becomes a more socially accessible place, a quality denied by the awkward fragmentation of the lawn now. The dynamic between art and architecture explored through the form and work of the gallery is paralleled by the project as a whole, which creates a place that invites the public to interact with the university.

Tectonic Model: Entry Ramp & Section Views

ARCH

100A / SPRIN

G 2009 / A

CAD

EMIC W

ORK

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First Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor

Plans1 Courtyard2 Entry Ramp3 Gallery4 To Wurster Hall5 Lecture Room6 Roof Terrace

Key Site PlanKroeber Plaza 1Wurster Hall 2Kroeber Hall 3

Boalt Hall 4Bancroft Way 5

College Ave 6

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

2

3

56

4

not to scale x

4 80 16 32 64'

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Concept Sketch and Circulation StudyLongitudinal Section

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Site ModelCross Section

2 40 8 16 32'

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345

1. Hard Transitions

2. Bridges

3. Abandoned Buildings

4. Outdoor Kitchens

5. Village Density

HUSTLE & SLOWSCUT-UCB RURAL STUDY WORKSHOPJIUTAN VILLAGE, GUANGZHOU, CHINAJiutan Village is an example of a peculiar condition resulting from the rapid urbanization of Southern China. Officially part of the Guangzhou metropolis, the village is a vestige of the region’s agricultural past captured within the city. Though the village’s inhabitants would hardly consider themselves urbanites, it is undeniable that their home has been changed from the city’s influence and faces much more change to come.

Our study of the village considered how the identity of Jiutan, an agricultural one still relevant to the lives of its inhabitants, could adapt and thrive with the rest of the burgeoning area instead of merely being preserved.

The key for the village we discovered were the ponds that are its namesake: jiu = nine or "many," tan = ponds. They form the backbone of the development and outline an important motor vehicle artery. The areas around the ponds were home to various uses for villagers but mostly as extensions of private activity. Besides their shared importance for circulation, they were generally neglected in regards to community and aesthetic value. The edge of the system of ponds could be further developed to firmly establish it as public space that would revive a village identity tied to the waterfront. Various interventions were developed that could demonstrate how the village could respond to existing conditions along this edge and intensify their use over time. In this way, a lively, connected waterfront that accommodates both the hustle of traffic and places to slow down for social togetherness could be created.

Team Credits:Field research conducted with Faye Dou, South China University of TechnologyConcepts and project proposal produced in collaboration with Allison Allbee and Allison Owens, UC BerkeleyPictured work produced by Kenny Wong

EXISTING EDGE

ARCH

179 / SPRING

2011 / ACA

DEM

IC WO

RK not to scale x

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1. Homes – Street – Pond Access

2. Intersection – Garden – Bridge

INTERVENTIONS

3. Courtyard – Library – Open Square

4. Street – Kitchen – Porch

ANCHOR CONDITIONS RESPONSIVE PROGRAMROADSOPEN AREASBUILDINGS IN DISREPAIRGARDENSEXISTING TREESBRIDGESOUTDOOR KITCHENSHOMES

BIKE PATHPLAYGROUNDSARTWORKLIBRARYPORCHESPOND ACCESSOUTLOOKS

BIKE PATHPLAYGROUNDSARTWORKLIBRARYPORCHESPOND ACCESSOUTLOOKS

INTENSIFYING USE

5. High-Rise – Street – Trees – Outlook

2 40 8 16 32'

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STITCH SPACEGUARDAMAR DEL SEGURA, SPAIN

For this project, an experiential design process was critical. After exploring the town, abstract diagrams were created on a sheet of mylar to describe cycles and phenomena witnessed in its life. These were then overlaid with images captured during the excursions that were digitally manipulated to further the initial analysis. A second round of diagramming followed to synthesize the superimposed work and continue to build the information on the mylar. A quick modeling session followed, using only found materials to begin considering how these diagrams might manifest themselves in three dimensions. Subsequently, drawings of the model were made on the same sheet of mylar.

In this way, the experiences within the town were allowed to influence and meld into the design thinking before arriving at any formal results. The sheet of mylar accumulated ideas and personal intuitions and became a living artifact of the design process.

The town of Guardamar del Segura on Spain’s southern Costa Blanca has morphed from a small fishing village into a tourist destination. Its beautiful and warm beaches have drawn foreigners as well as summer rental apartments that remain empty for most of the year. Much of its traditional identity has been lost in catering to visitors, but it has also developed new cycles of time related to its role in tourism.

To allow the town to recover a sense of its real history, a connection was sought with the castle that was the heart of town life before its ruin in an earthquake hundreds of years ago. A master plan was developed to create an art colony on the removed site that would utilize the weekly ritual of the “mercadillo,” or street market, to stitch the town back to the old fortification. The mercadillo is a key part of the town's cycles, and studios within the walls of the castle would attract and house the artists and craftsmen that sell their wares to visitors. The space is broken down through buildings that carve in and out of its walls and the ground. Instead of reestablishing the castle as a monolithic fortress, the new colony would promote greater interaction in and through the space by encouraging people to view exhibitions and work being created in the studios.

The flux of population due to tourism would be matched by a cycle of invasion and retreat as people descend from the castle to open their seasonal stores and services. For the rest of the year the town’s artist population compresses back into the castle wall, building a critical mass for social interaction and creativity in their arts and crafts.

Castillo de Guardamar Fortification from the City El Mercadillo in the Streets

ARCH

101 & 199 / SU

MM

ER 2011 / ACA

DEM

IC WO

RK

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not to scale x

Site PlanMercadillo (Market) Avenue 1

Exhibition Center Entry 2Castle Entrance 3

Printmaking, Leatherworks, Fashion Studios 4Architecture Studio 5

Underground Exhibition Center 6Painting Studio 7

Sculpture Studio 8Ceramics Studio 9

Cafe and Exhibition Center Entry 10Musical Performance Area 11

Observation Level 12

1

2

3

4

7

8

9

5

6

10 11 12

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2: Documentation1: Diagram0: Phenomena

SUN/MOONSTREET/ENCLAVE

SPECTACLETIDE

TRAUMAACCRETION

RITUALRETREATINVASION

WAVE

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3: Synthesis

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AMPM

AMPM

2013 / COM

PETITION

ENTRIES

WELLFLEETADD-ON UNITWELLFLEET, MASSACHUSETTSThe Cape Cod Modern House Trust hosted a competition to design accessory dwelling units that would address the lack of affordable homes in this small New England town.

To welcome new residents as part of the community, the Wellfleet Add-On is situated towards the public street rather than being hidden behind the main residence. In contrast to typical in-law units the proposed design establishes a presence for renters in the neighborhood, encouraging greater towards participation in it. The unit's design creates degrees of privacy which are often missing from small studio-style accommodations where everything inside can be scrutinized at once. The front dining and kitchen area serves as the main social stage and is separated from a more intimate living room. The lofted bedroom is the most private space, allowing quiet contemplation and rest. Despite a small footprint, the Wellfleet Add-On offers the sense of a complete house with its variety of spaces which are aided by changing ceiling heights and diagonal sight-lines that stretch their depth.

The climate of Cape Cod requires heating through most of the year. To reduce the costs and maintain comfort, different thermal zones are created through the Wellfleet Add-On’s organization. Spaces of the house can be sectioned off by insulated partitions throughout the day. The thermal strategy connects with the approach to privacy. A daily cycle would see the residents wake and move outwards through progressively cooler spaces before leaving in the morning. The large south-facing window and slanted ceiling allow the day’s warmth to collect in the loft for their return. After entertaining guests in the evening, the house is tucked in as the insulated partitions are closed and residents retreat back to the warm bedroom for the night.

PlansBuilding Diagram

1 20 4 8 16'

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AMPM

AMPM

AMPM

Interior Perspective

Site Plan not to scale x

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Concept Diagram Unrolled Site Elevation 1 2

2013 / COM

PETITION

ENTRIES

FREEPLAYSAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The structure of the freeway dissolves as parts of the deck are subtracted or replaced by lighter materials, and columns are selectively removed to accommodate larger programmatic elements. In Parcel 4 many columns are preserved to create an agora that allows play to take on different relationships with the over-scaled infrastructure. At the other end of the site on Parcels 5 and 6, designers, tinkerers, and makers alike can rent studios along the existing railway. Shared shop equipment, laser cutters, and CNC milling machines roll back and forth on the tracks among the freeway's columns. Inflatable work pods can be set up to allow for temporary collaborative workspaces or pop-up studios. By demonstrating a full spectrum of uses, Freeplay helps pave the way for greater cultural investment in these underutilized and leftover spaces.

Team Credits:Concepts and project proposal produced in collaboration with Lorraine Gemino, Annie Liu, and Jennifer TaiParcel 6 rendering produced by Kenny Wong

Play is a concept typically reserved for children; it infuses all of their experiences while adults are limited to thinking in dichotomies of work and home. Freeplay seeks to expand the public sphere by providing a playscape friendly to grown-ups that encourages them to reconnect with and expand their creativity and imagination. By mixing temporary structures with parts of the decommissioned Interstate 280, Freeplay creates a new way to experience the city landscape and to engage in play as part of everyday life.

Iterative placemaking allows people to democratize their built environment and test out ideas in real time. Freeplay equips citizens with inflatables of varying size and shape to afford expanded possibilities of sitting, floating, bathing, performing, working, and sleeping in public. The temporary nature of these interventions allow for space to be transformed to accommodate different needs at different times. The dynamic nature of inflatables is such that each time one is added to the site it changes the whole's organization according to the buzz of activity.

Freeplay begins at Parcels 1 and 2, where the deck of Highway 280 is left in place to create an overlook to the city and to the rest of the project. Here, first-time visitors can rent event space, participate in community gardening, and borrow inflatables. Venturing southeast to Parcel 3, one can deploy an inflatable stage, sauna, and rafts into Mission Creek. The creek becomes a platform for community gathering and events.

Parcels 1 & 2: Events & Overlook

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3 4 5 6

Parcel 3: Float & Observe Parcel 4: Agora & Gathering Parcel 5: Pod Dispersion

Parcel 6: Live & MakeParcel 6 Existing Conditions

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2013–2015 / PROFESSIO

NA

L WO

RK

Headquartered in Irvine, California, KTGY Group is a full service architecture and planning firm with five offices across the United States. As a Design Associate on the High-Density Design team for multifamily housing, I contributed to projects ranging from 20 to over 200 dwelling units in the San Francisco Bay Area. My experience included different building types, the most common being new 3- and 4-story Type V construction and Type V over Type I mixed-use podium buildings. These contained both for-rent and for-sale housing and were often on urban infill sites being redeveloped.

I was heavily involved in pre- and schematic design, frequently conducting research on zoning regulations and city design guidelines through local planning codes and specific plans. In schematic phases I designed elevations, composed plans, and created illustrative project imagery. I gained familiarity with the California Building Code and Americans with Disabilities Act to verify project compliance and to perform basic code analysis. Working alongside the High-Density Production team, I designed conceptual details and saw their implementation through design development and construction documentation.

Besides design responsibilities, I assisted project architects with consultant coordination, attended meetings, and worked directly with clients' project managers to deliver architectural services. At the planning level I helped to navigate different city processes to submit entitlement packages, including 3 development permit applications and comment responses in the city of Menlo Park, California.

KTGY GROUPOAKLAND, CALIFORNIA Schematic Design & Entitlements

Haven Avenue, Menlo Park, California

Renderings on this page byKTGY Group with MABO Studio

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(E) STUD WALL

(E) INTERIOR FINISH

"J" MOLDING

SHEATHING

METAL TRIM PROFILE O/ METALATTACHMENT CLIP

WINDOW

2" 1/4"

4"

1/4"

2"1/

4"

4"

7/8"

W.R.B.

SHEATHING

(E) STUD WALL

3-COAT STUCCO SYSTEM

(E) INTERIOR FINISH

WINDOW

METAL TRIM PROFILE O/ METALATTACHMENT CLIP

2"1/

4"

4"

W.R.B.

SHEATHING

(E) STUD WALL

3-COAT STUCCO SYSTEM

(E) INTERIOR FINISH

WINDOW

METAL TRIM PROFILE O/ METALATTACHMENT CLIP

FLASHING SCREED

321

1/4" 5/8"

EXTERIOR GYPSUM BOARD

7/8"

5/8"

EXTERIOR GYPSUM BOARDW.R.B.

EXTERIOR GYPSUM BOARD"J" MOLDING

3-COAT STUCCO SYSTEM

"J" MOLDING

INSULATION

INSULATION

INSULATION

1/4"

1/4"

7/8"

5/8"

1/4"

Xref .\xref\x130854_DTB_24x36_Horizontal.dwg

DETAILS A2.7

1

2"2"

8"1'-0

"

1/2" PER FT. SLOPE

STUCCO PARAPET (BEYOND)

5"

GSM FASCIA FLASHING

4"

1/2"

1/2"

VENT STRIP PER MFR.

MIN. 1/2" GAP

W.R.B.

WOOD FRAMING

SHEATHING

REVEAL 2.0 OVER 1X4 PT FURRING STRIP.

PAN HEAD SCREW PERMFR. - POWDER COATED

MIN. 1/16 EPDM BTWN. PANEL ANDFURRING STRIP

7'-4"

2

W.R.B.

WOOD FRAMING

SHEATHING

REVEAL 2.0 OVER 1X4 PT FURRING STRIP.MIN. 1/16 EPDM BTWN. PANEL AND FURRING STRIP

EXTERIOR GYPSUM SHEATHING

4"

LINE OF BAY (BEYOND)

1/2"4"

W.R.B.

WOOD FRAMING

SHEATHING

REVEAL 2.0 OVER 1X4 PT FURRING STRIP.MIN. 1/16 EPDM BTWN. PANELAND FURRING STRIP

EXTERIOR GYPSUM SHEATHING

BAY METAL TRIMTRIM ATTACHMENT CLIP

1'-6"

4"

Xref .\xref\x130854_DTB_24x36_Horizontal.dwg

DETAILS A2.10

Key Elevation

Window with Metal Trimin Stucco

1 2

Wood Framed Metal Awning

Office GraphicsMonthly Pecha Kucha

Conceptual Details & Project CoordinationPost Street, San Francisco, California

Schematic DesignWheeler Plaza, San Francisco, California

Schematic Design & Project CoordinationEncinal Avenue, Menlo Park, California

Unit PlansMontague Avenue, Milpitas, California

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SMALL WORKS

ARCH

160 / SPRING

2011 / ACA

DEM

IC WO

RK

WURSTER HALL, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIAThese two pieces of furniture were designed to be site-specific in Wurster Hall and as a way gain experience in fabrication with the two materials.

The steel and glass coffee table was designed for the building's entrance lobby. Cable tie holes left exposed from Wurster Hall's construction were used to cantilever the table with an elegant, minimal profile. The table’s connection to the wall was made by steel cable joined to legs of hollow structural steel with a square profile. Turnbuckles were used along the cable in case adjustments were required for an uneven floor. Flat bar stock was welded onto the steel legs to provide thin arms that support the glass surface and also to provide bracing for the arms.

The wooden table and bench connects to concrete planters outside of Wurster Hall. The design uses the planter to support a table that extends outwards. The table bridges interaction between one person sitting on the slatted bench and one on another section of the planter. Telescoping L-joints were designed to allow the surface to collapse onto itself when not in use. Simple pin joints also allowed the staggered slats of the seat to fold compact, making the whole easier to store.

Design and fabrication completed with Yu Chen, John Lee, and Annie Liu

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